Standing!

I don’t ride in groups much, so I have to get my peloton etiquette from watching pro racing. Lately I’ve noticed a new double elbow flick that I’m sure I never saw in the past. I’ve tried to capture it on a video, but failed, however you probably already know this one. If you don’t, it sort of looks like the 2nd move in The Chicken Dance, except your hands are on your bars, not tickling your ribs.

This gesture is a signal to the riders behind you that you are about to stand up, often a necessary alert because most people I know slow down momentarily when they do this. There is a simple technique to avoid this sudden decrease in speed, but we’ll address that in another episode. What I want to say about this ‘flick’ is that I’m sure it’s much preferable to someone screaming ‘standing!’, or anything else for that matter. I jump out of my skin sometimes when I hear well-intentioned people screeching warnings.

Do you all use this technique? Ever seen it? I’ve seen it at least 5 or 6 times this season in races, but never in real life.

14 thoughts on “Standing!

  1. I wish that existed in the Fondo ride I was in a few years back. A guy in front of me stood up, slowed down momentarily while I was drafting him and I hit his wheel, down I go! The only time I’ve ever crashed in a race.

    • Yes, that’s irritating. I’ve never fallen from this, but have come pretty close. A simple gear shift before standing solves this, but lots of riders don’t do it, I guess.

  2. I’ve never seen it in real life or ever noticed it on tv. I’ve seen flicks of elbows in breakaways (on tv) but it’s usually telling the guy behind to take a turn. One friend that I’ve followed when he stands seems to almost come to a standstill. Or go in reverse!! I’ve missed running into him several times. Don’t know how Froome manages as he always looks down.

    • Now that I’ve mentioned it you’ll be seeing it everywhere! I’ve ridden behind riders like your friend, too. Best to keep your distance with that one.

  3. Never seen it in my races. Most riders make an effort to not slow down when standing in a tight peloton, and if they don’t they quickly here about it…

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